Watch a NASA Rocket Spark Glowing Artificial Clouds Early Thursday

Watch a NASA Rocket Spark Glowing Artificial Clouds Early Thursday

Watch a NASA Rocket Spark Glowing Artificial Clouds Early Thursday

If you are on the Atlantic coast road early Thursday (June 1), you are looking! A NASA probe rocket will release light emitting blue-green and red water vapor into the sky. Weather permitting, artificial clouds will be visible from New York to North Carolina and west of Charlottesville, Virginia.

The probe rocket will launch from 4: 27-04: 42 am EDT (0.827 to 0842 GMT) from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia and release the bright artificial clouds so that researchers can track down the movement of particles in the atmosphere and The Earth’s upper ionosphere. You can see the live launch here at Space.com, courtesy of NASA Wallops. You can also see the launch directly from Wallops Flight Facility here. (NASA officials have stressed that the start-up is very time-dependent because clear clouds are forced to observe artificial clouds from the ground.)

Steam tracers will be released from 96 to 120 miles high (154 193 km) and will not pose any danger to people living along the coast, NASA officials said in a statement. Plotters glow after release, such as barium, strontium and cupric oxide interacting with the atmosphere, NASA said.
See a NASA rocket that sparkles artificial clouds Spark dawn on Thursday
The projected visibility of steam tracer during the mission on June 1. Artificial clouds should be visible from New York to North Carolina, and as far as Charlottesville, Virginia.
Credit: NASA
If you are on the Atlantic coast road early Thursday (June 1), you are looking! A NASA probe rocket will release light emitting blue-green and red water vapor into the sky. Weather permitting, artificial clouds will be visible from New York to North Carolina and west of Charlottesville, Virginia.

The probe rocket will launch from 4: 27-04: 42 am EDT (0.827 to 0842 GMT) from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia and release the bright artificial clouds so that researchers can track down the movement of particles in the atmosphere and The Earth’s upper ionosphere. You can see the live launch here at Space.com, courtesy of NASA Wallops. You can also see the launch directly from Wallops Flight Facility here. (NASA officials have stressed that the start-up is very time-dependent because clear clouds are forced to observe artificial clouds from the ground.)

Steam tracers will be released from 96 to 120 miles high (154 193 km) and will not pose any danger to people living along the coast, NASA officials said in a statement. Plotters glow after release, such as barium, strontium and cupric oxide interacting with the atmosphere, NASA said.
The rocket will eject 10 advertising size canadens between 6 and 12 miles (10-20 km) of the main payload of the rocket and those containers release the steamer 4 to 5.5 minutes after the launch, authorities said. The launch was postponed from May 29 due to weather conditions.

The cameras will be parked on the ground, as well as in Wallops Duck, North Carolina; Although clear sky is preferred, the launch may continue without clear conditions at both sites, NASA officials said. The vessels will be taken out of an improved Malemute-Terrier two-stroke rocket and full-time mission escape is set at 8 minutes. The primary payload, which includes ferries, will land about 90 miles (145 km) off Wallops Island in the Atlantic Ocean and will not be recovered, authorities said.